About the Project > Overview
  • Increased knowledge of scholarship on the history of the struggle for democracy in America.
  • Increased ability to teach students (including English language learners) to read historical documents and to write coherent and thoughtful historical essays, papers, and accounts.
  • Increased use of primary and secondary sources.
  •  Use of the textbook as part of the curriculum, not as the curriculum.
  • The development and teaching of lessons, units, and assessments, focused on democracy, that incorporate state and district standards.
  • Sharing, critiquing, and building upon classroom practice.
  • Increased engagement in the study of American History.
  • Improved ability to read and write history.
  • Increased numbers of student choosing to take and then succeeding on tests that measure historical knowledge and understanding. (i.e. Golden State and AP)
  • Greater understanding of how individuals and groups have struggled for a more democratic society and a greater understanding of how they and their classmates connect to that history.
  • Work that will inform and assist teachers of American History beyond the ninety that will participate during the three years of the grant.
  • Participating teachers work with colleagues, in a variety of settings, to improve the teaching and learning of American History both within and beyond the district.
  • Learning how the teaching of a concept can be articulated forstudents at different developmental levels.
  • Development of a body of classroom lessons, units, and assessments that pull together the OUSD historical thinking standards and instruction about democracy in American History in grades 5, 8, and 11.